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Sep 25

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How to protect yourself from a phishing attempt

Phishing…yes or no?

Phishing alert! This morning, I received a rather suspicious e-mail claiming to be from Amazon.com. This looked like an order confirmation for a TV someone purchased and shipped to Alabama. Upon inspection, I learned this was a phish attempt. I deleted the fraudulent message. I want to show how to identify a phish attempt on your own.

This message looked like a typical Amazon.com order confirmation. It had the Amazon logo and usual fonts. It even had hyperlinks in the usual places. It looked pretty good.

I was suspicious. I have not ordered a TV from Amazon.com and do not know anyone in Alabama. I checked the message and determined it was truly a phishing attempt. According to Wikipedia, Phishing is the act of attempting to acquire information such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details (and sometimes, indirectly, money) by masquerading as a trustworthy entity in an electronic communication.

Fraudsters are getting better by the day. They want to trick you into revealing your account numbers and passwords. Do not fall for their phishing tricks.

Fraudsters are getting better by the day. They want to trick you into revealing your account numbers and passwords. Do not fall for their phishing tricks.

How to tell

The answer is pretty straightforward. I moved my mouse pointer over the “Order Details” link but did not click it. This link, if I had clicked it, would have taken me to someone’s website at http://frontsighttacticalanddefense.com. Surely not Amazon.com. This is a simple trick you can use to make sure you do not fall for a phishing attempt. Be safe everybody!

Fraudsters are getting better by the day. They want to trick you into revealing your account numbers and passwords. Do not fall for their phishing tricks.

Fraudsters are getting better by the day. They want to trick you into revealing your account numbers and passwords. Do not fall for their phishing tricks.

Permanent link to this article: http://cameronparkcomputer.com/blog/phishing-attempt/

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